Death in Kentucky

The Dastardly Past:  Death in Kentucky.

general denhardt

September 20, 1937 saw the close of a nearly year-long melodrama that had gripped the state of Kentucky.  Brigadier-General Henry H. Denhardt, age 61 and the state’s former Lieutenant Governor and Adjutant General, lay dead from several gunshot wounds.  The three Garr brothers, accused of attacking him in front of the Armstrong Hotel in Shelbyville, Kentucky, sat in jail.  And not a single member of the public questioned how this had happened.  They knew.

A year earlier, on November 6, 1936, the general’s fiancé, Verna Garr Taylor, had been found shot to death in a wet ditch along a lonely road outside of Louisville.  The beautiful forty-one-year-old widow had spent the day in the city with the general and they were returning to her home that night when the car stalled.  After that the sequence of events grew murky.  The general testified that Mrs. Taylor walked ahead for help at a nearby gas station.  A passing motorist stopped and spoke to the general, offering help.  Later another car passed and its driver reported seeing the general standing by his car.  According a nearby farmer, he heard a shot fired.  Then another.  He went to investigate.  The exact positions of Denhardt and Taylor during this time isn’t clear from reports.  Eventually the investigating farmer encountered the general near the road and they discovered Taylor’s body several hundred yards from the car.  Denhardt’s service revolver rested beside it.

verna

Police arrested Denhardt for Mrs. Taylor’s murder.  He was known to have an “overbearing” personality, and several members of her family, including her two daughters and her three brothers, had opposed their engagement.  Denhardt could not consistently explain the minute traces of blood on his overcoat.  As a defense, he asserted that Mrs. Taylor had been threatening suicide, despite testimony to the contrary as well as their recent engagement.  Authorities ruled out robbery, since the victim still wore her $1500 engagement ring when discovered.  A two-week trial ensued in the late spring of 1937, but it resulted in a hung jury.  The judge ordered a new trial set for September.

Many people believed that Denhardt, given his influential connections, would escape justice a second time.  Certainly Mrs. Taylor’s three brothers believed it, despite the fact that several more witnesses for the prosecution had come forward.  The day before the new trial began, somebody telephoned the hotel to ask if Denhardt was registered there.  The desk clerk said they were expecting him.  That evening Mrs. Taylor’s brothers, Jack, Roy, and Dr. E. S. Garr, encountered Denhardt on Main Street and shots rang out, killing the general.  In a nod toward public opinion, state officials declined to lower the flag over the capitol building in deference to the passing of the former lieutenant governor.  And, as a postscript, a jury acquitted the Garrs of all charges two months later.

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